Rat Runners is a lot of what you love in your futuristic SciFi but is still inexplicably unique

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Rat Runners is a lot of what you love in your futuristic SciFi but is still inexplicably unique

I really wish there was a book trailer for Rat Runners by Oisin McGann because it is hard to get a real sense of what the book is about from either the title or the cover. Street smart kids outwit the mob bosses who coerce them into committing crimes in a 1984esque future. But that falls flat, too. It is tense and smart and full of high tech spy gadgets. You should read it. That is really the best I can do, boys and girls. For those of you not in the womb during the mid nineties, it reminded me of Hackers. Do you remember that? It had young, young Angelina Jolie and Johnny Lee Miller and it was about teen hackers outsmarting the adults. I felt so subversive just watching it!
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My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I received a copy of this book from the publisher via Net Galley in exchange for an honest review. In the future world, the only people who can escape the intense scrutiny of the government surveillance system are young teens. Mob bosses use these rat runners to carry out jobs through coercion and fear. When one group of runners discovers an invention that could change everything, they decide to use their street smarts and tech skills to keep it out of the hands of their boss, but the boss has more than just a few kids on his side, and he is willing to kill to get what he wants. While I initially struggled with this book, it became much more engaging once all of the players were introduced. The teens in this book were smart and resourceful, and, despite their association with illegal activities, they had a sense of right and justice. I think YA readers of both genders will enjoy this book. While the overall plot is not like Alex Rider, the Bourne books, or Mission Impossible, the secret and covert missions carried out are just as tense and the bad guys are just as threatening. Readers who enjoy books along that line and are willing to stick through the introductory chapters will be glad they did. The language and situations are appropriate for grades 7+.

Don’t believe me and my “old lady” (read: mid thirties) opinions? See what a real YA had to say. http://www.teenreads.com/reviews/rat-runners

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About queenbook

When the final bell rings, I stash those messy piles of essays and analysis assignments in a desk drawer and I head home to a pile of good books. My kids and dog eat too many chicken nuggets and the house could be neater, but as long as I get my daily read, I guess we are doing all right. When I was twelve and fifteen and eighteen and twenty, I believed I needed to get out there and do those things I had just been reading about, which ended in disaster, tears, a tattoo that scares me every time I catch a glimpse of it in the mirror, and the realization that some of us are meant for action, and some of us are meant to critique the pace of action in a book. I read primarily YA fiction as I have a rather hulking classroom library and a hundred high school readers to engage daily. Nothing makes me happier than coming to school and finding an impatient teenager waiting by my door to turn in a book and get another one just like it. I adore a good zombie, a medieval princess, or girl assassin (I would like them all in one book if you are a writer looking for some inspiration). I add historical mystery to my wish list a year in advance, and you should get out of my way when the next Outlander book comes out. I have an embarrassing fondness for rock star books, but only if they don’t get too trashy and embarrass me. My favorite book of all time is The Blue Castle by L.M. Montgomery. My book boyfriends include Gilbert Blythe, Alonzo Wilder, and Jamie Fraser. They are mine and you can’t have them.

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