All the Rage – A YA mystery/suspense that takes a hard look at an ugly topic 

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All the Rage – A YA mystery/suspense that takes a hard look at an ugly topic 

Romy’s fragile half life crumbles further when she and another girl are reported missing on the same night, and she is the only one who makes it back home. All the Rage is as hard hitting as Speak or Living Dead Girl, and it is just as compelling. It is an unflinching and dark look at the suppression and shame inflicted on a victim of rape, and most readers will find they must continue reading Romy’s story, if only to be a silent witness to her victimization

Goodreads Summary

The sheriff’s son, Kellan Turner, is not the golden boy everyone thinks he is, and Romy Grey knows that for a fact. Because no one wants to believe a girl from the wrong side of town, the truth about him has cost her everything—friends, family, and her community. Branded a liar and bullied relentlessly by a group of kids she used to hang out with, Romy’s only refuge is the diner where she works outside of town. No one knows her name or her past there; she can finally be anonymous. But when a girl with ties to both Romy and Kellan goes missing after a party, and news of him assaulting another girl in a town close by gets out, Romy must decide whether she wants to fight or carry the burden of knowing more girls could get hurt if she doesn’t speak up. Nobody believed her the first time—and they certainly won’t now — but the cost of her silence might be more than she can bear.

With a shocking conclusion and writing that will absolutely knock you out, All the Rage examines the shame and silence inflicted upon young women after an act of sexual violence, forcing us to ask ourselves: In a culture that refuses to protect its young girls, how can they survive? 

My Thoughts

While I found I could not put this book down, I did have trouble following shifts in the narrative, particularly at the beginning of the book, and several times I had to reread sections. Romy can also be a frustrating character, because of and despite the sympathy she evokes. The ending was surprising, but not altogether satisfying. This is a book that demands conversation, and I think it will be one that high school students will be desperate to discuss. It is an important topic, but this is a book that is going to be controversial for some parents due to the dark, unrelenting tone. Language and situations make this a read for mature high school readers.

This book is available in the MHS library.

I received an ARC of this book from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

 

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About queenbook

When the final bell rings, I stash those messy piles of essays and analysis assignments in a desk drawer and I head home to a pile of good books. My kids and dog eat too many chicken nuggets and the house could be neater, but as long as I get my daily read, I guess we are doing all right. When I was twelve and fifteen and eighteen and twenty, I believed I needed to get out there and do those things I had just been reading about, which ended in disaster, tears, a tattoo that scares me every time I catch a glimpse of it in the mirror, and the realization that some of us are meant for action, and some of us are meant to critique the pace of action in a book. I read primarily YA fiction as I have a rather hulking classroom library and a hundred high school readers to engage daily. Nothing makes me happier than coming to school and finding an impatient teenager waiting by my door to turn in a book and get another one just like it. I adore a good zombie, a medieval princess, or girl assassin (I would like them all in one book if you are a writer looking for some inspiration). I add historical mystery to my wish list a year in advance, and you should get out of my way when the next Outlander book comes out. I have an embarrassing fondness for rock star books, but only if they don’t get too trashy and embarrass me. My favorite book of all time is The Blue Castle by L.M. Montgomery. My book boyfriends include Gilbert Blythe, Alonzo Wilder, and Jamie Fraser. They are mine and you can’t have them.

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