Omni is one YA reimagining that you should probably skip

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Omni is one YA reimagining that you should probably skip

The story of Paris and Helen of Troy set in a dystopian future?  Yes, sign me up, please.  Except, you really probably didn’t consider how annoying a classic idea could be when translated too directly into a futuristic setting.  There are some good ideas here, but it was ultimately a fail.  I haven’t been this irritated by a book in some time.  While I really respect indie authors, I still think they need a trusted editor, and this book desperately needs one.  It reads like a first draft, as far as plot and character development go.  I gave it two stars.

  
 Rather like a dystopian soap opera, Omni was overly dramatic and failed to develop characters beyond a villain or hero archetype. And there is insta love, the dreaded pet peeve that I have a hard time forgiving in a book over two hundred pages.  Pierce is the protagonist, and his mouth just keeps writing checks his tail can’t cash.  While some readers may see this as chivalry, in truth, it was a constant beatdown.  Instead of coming across as heroic, he came across as idiotic.  Give him mad fighting skills or at least brains enough to avoid an every-other-chapter butt whooping. His leading lady is Harmony, a perpetual damsal in distress.  I understand how a classic story like this could translate badly for female characters, but an updated setting requires an updated leading lady, and for most modern YA readers, that means a girl who eventually learns to take care of herself.  Every other person on Earth would have come up with some way to protect themselves from the threat she faced: Kung Fu training, pepper spray, blackmail, a strategically placed knee – something! Harmony just relied on every other character in the book to save her over and over.  The pace, too, was problematic. Encounter after encounter was engineered to create drama between the protagonist and the antagonist.  These encounters rarely moved the story forward and they didn’t serve to develop characters.  Where is an editor when you need one?  Because even the greats need one, so you do too!  The single most interesting subplot didn’t surface until almost the end of the story, and I just couldn’t help but think the whole thing would have been better if that subplot had been used as Pierce’s beginning point.  Overall, this just didn’t live up to my expectations, and I think it will fall flat for most discerning readers.  

I received an ARC from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

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About queenbook

When the final bell rings, I stash those messy piles of essays and analysis assignments in a desk drawer and I head home to a pile of good books. My kids and dog eat too many chicken nuggets and the house could be neater, but as long as I get my daily read, I guess we are doing all right. When I was twelve and fifteen and eighteen and twenty, I believed I needed to get out there and do those things I had just been reading about, which ended in disaster, tears, a tattoo that scares me every time I catch a glimpse of it in the mirror, and the realization that some of us are meant for action, and some of us are meant to critique the pace of action in a book. I read primarily YA fiction as I have a rather hulking classroom library and a hundred high school readers to engage daily. Nothing makes me happier than coming to school and finding an impatient teenager waiting by my door to turn in a book and get another one just like it. I adore a good zombie, a medieval princess, or girl assassin (I would like them all in one book if you are a writer looking for some inspiration). I add historical mystery to my wish list a year in advance, and you should get out of my way when the next Outlander book comes out. I have an embarrassing fondness for rock star books, but only if they don’t get too trashy and embarrass me. My favorite book of all time is The Blue Castle by L.M. Montgomery. My book boyfriends include Gilbert Blythe, Alonzo Wilder, and Jamie Fraser. They are mine and you can’t have them.

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