Sight by Juliet Madison is a sweet (maybe overly sweet) YA paranormal romance

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Sight by Juliet Madison is a sweet (maybe overly sweet) YA paranormal romance

I was really drawn to the cover of this book, and the premise didn’t sound bad either.  The problem for me was that it came across as a little too far fetched, even for a work of paranormal fiction.  That sounds like a stupid thing to say, but if you’ve ever been annoyed by too many coincidences or a deus ex machina, you may know exactly what I mean.  I won’t steer you clear of it because it is basically a cute, sweet romance but it challenged my suspension of disbelief sorely.  

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Goodreads Summary

I spent my birthday fast asleep. In a coma to be exact.

When Savannah wakes up after two months in the hospital, she sees a whole lot more than expected, things that could put those close to her at risk.
The five Delcarta sisters have never believed in the paranormal, not like their woo-woo mother. Instead they believe in the power of sisterhood, of romance, and rebuilding their lives after their father’s mysterious disappearance nine years earlier. Starting anew in the small town of Iris Harbor, they see potential in all.
But Savannah’s awakening after having surgery on a life-threatening aneurysm brings a unique ability to the Delcarta sisters–together, each can predict the future with one of the five senses. And Savannah has the gift of sight.
A serial arsonist has been terrorizing the tight-knit community, and the Delcarta sisters have their suspicions on who could be to blame, including a boy who starts as an adversary to Savannah and then very quickly becomes her whole world. Investigating these crimes, trying to stop them before the next flame is sparked will call upon Savannah to use her newfound abilities with the help of her sisters, and will put each of their lives in danger.
This stunning new paranormal series blends the sweetest of romances with breathless suspense, and introduces five young women who share a haunted past, an extraordinary gift, and an uncertain future. 
My Thoughts

This was a gentle, clean YA paranormal romance.  Savannah, her five sisters and her mother make up the bulk of the characters, and they manage to give off a warm and inviting family atmosphere, which is nice to see in a YA book.  Savannah’s romantic interest is a teen dream, if a generic one, and he manages to draw Savannah into a nice bantering relationship before sweeping her off her feet.  I liked the reveal about why he didn’t really use her name, but felt drawn to her because of her name at the same time. That was a perfect moment! The plot was easy to follow, but it wasn’t one that juggled subplots with ease.  Often one conflict would become the focus, and the others disappeared into the background until it was time for their spotlight. It made the plot feel a little choppy, especially towards the ending when the big element was trotted back out for the resolution.  This resulted in an uneven sense of threat and suspense as well.  The ending was satisfactory, if predictable, but the motive for the big villain wasn’t very believable and felt contrived.  While this book is entertaining enough, it is a little too sweet, and many will find certain elements over the top (twins +triplets, each has one sensory power and they connect, their names begin with the letter of their “power” sense, etc.).  It might not be a problem for some, but discerning readers can only take so much coincidence before the book feels too artificially engineered and hinders the suspension of disbelief.  Also, the use of names that began with the same letter made it hard to distinguish the sisters.  I know the author was trying to make them distinct, but the truth is that most readers don’t actually read character names – they read the first letter and their brain fills in the blank.  So, if half of the characters have the same initial, it is almost impossible to tell them apart.  Overall, I think the target audience will be much less bothered by my perceived “flaws” than adult readers.  

I received an ARC from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

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About queenbook

When the final bell rings, I stash those messy piles of essays and analysis assignments in a desk drawer and I head home to a pile of good books. My kids and dog eat too many chicken nuggets and the house could be neater, but as long as I get my daily read, I guess we are doing all right. When I was twelve and fifteen and eighteen and twenty, I believed I needed to get out there and do those things I had just been reading about, which ended in disaster, tears, a tattoo that scares me every time I catch a glimpse of it in the mirror, and the realization that some of us are meant for action, and some of us are meant to critique the pace of action in a book. I read primarily YA fiction as I have a rather hulking classroom library and a hundred high school readers to engage daily. Nothing makes me happier than coming to school and finding an impatient teenager waiting by my door to turn in a book and get another one just like it. I adore a good zombie, a medieval princess, or girl assassin (I would like them all in one book if you are a writer looking for some inspiration). I add historical mystery to my wish list a year in advance, and you should get out of my way when the next Outlander book comes out. I have an embarrassing fondness for rock star books, but only if they don’t get too trashy and embarrass me. My favorite book of all time is The Blue Castle by L.M. Montgomery. My book boyfriends include Gilbert Blythe, Alonzo Wilder, and Jamie Fraser. They are mine and you can’t have them.

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