Tag Archives: bad boys gone straight

Brigid Kemmerer’s Letters to the Lost

Standard
Brigid Kemmerer’s Letters to the Lost

Brigid Kemmerer’s Letters to the Lost is a tale of two people finding each other when they need someone the most.  It will appeal to fans of Rainbow Rowell’s Eleanor and Park and Julie Buxbaum’s Tell Me Three Things.  I found it engaging and satisfying, so I gave it four stars.

Letters to the Lost is publishing Tuesday, April 4, 2017.


Goodreads Summary

Juliet Young always writes letters to her mother, a world-traveling photojournalist. Even after her mother’s death, she leaves letters at her grave. It’s the only way Juliet can cope.

Declan Murphy isn’t the sort of guy you want to cross. In the midst of his court-ordered community service at the local cemetery, he’s trying to escape the demons of his past.

When Declan reads a haunting letter left beside a grave, he can’t resist writing back. Soon, he’s opening up to a perfect stranger, and their connection is immediate. But neither Declan nor Juliet knows that they’re not actually strangers. When life at school interferes with their secret life of letters, sparks will fly as Juliet and Declan discover truths that might tear them apart.

My Thoughts

I really enjoyed this book.  The main characters are believable, especially because they aren’t always perfect, and I found myself invested in their lives quickly.  I did think this was going to be more of a romance, but I wasn’t disappointed.  Juliet and Declan form a much needed friendship, and I was pleased when that seemed to be the bigger focus.  While the angry boy and sad girl are not new ideas; their journey to better is not the usual YA romance solution – readers can actually see the realistic actions that bring about their changes.  It hits home that the choices you make do impact the way you feel, the way you are perceived, and the way you are treated.  I really appreciate the fact that this book has all the drama my high school students want, but it also has messages that they can tie to their own lives.  I’m adding it to my classroom library wishlist and I know it will be a hit, especially with students who enjoy contemporary YA.  Language and situations are appropriate for high school, but adult readers of YA can enjoy it just as much.

I received an ARC from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

Advertisements

The End of Fun by Sean McGinty was kind of fun, but it was also stressful

Standard
The End of Fun by Sean McGinty was kind of fun, but it was also stressful

To be honest, this book kind of wore me out.  I’m not sure if it was just the challenge of dealing with a narrator who has the judgement of a three year old or if it was the format, which required a lot of product placement.  Both of those elements are essential to the humor and the strong narrative voice in the story, though, and are actually what I think many YA readers will find appealing.

image

Goodreads Summary

Everyday reality is a drag™.

FUN®—the latest in augmented reality—is fun (yay!) but it’s also frustrating, glitchy and dangerously addictive (boo!). Just when everyone else is getting on, seventeen-year-old Aaron O’Faolain wants off.

But first, he has to complete his Application for Termination, and in order to do that he has to deal with his History—not to mention the present, including his grandfather’s suicide and a series of clues that may (or may not) lead to buried treasure. As he attempts to unravel the mystery, Aaron is sidetracked again…and again. Shadowed by his virtual “best friend” Homie, Aaron struggles with love, loss, dog bites, werewolf pills, community theater, wild horses, wildfires and the fact (deep breath) that actual reality can sometimes surprise you.

Sean McGinty’s strikingly profound and laugh-out-loud funny debut unearths a world that is eerily familiar, yet utterly original. Discover what it means to come to the end of fun.

My Thoughts

Aaron is an impulsive idiot, but he is trying to move in the right direction, and his attempts at taking charge of his own fate are often disastrous and hilarious.  I liked him, but I felt like he needed a babysitter.  As far as the cast of supporting characters went, they were just as likeable, if often as misguided as Aaron.  If you are looking for a book to make you laugh, this is probably a good choice.  But I, of course, want something more than just laughs, so I was disappointed that the satire of the story was so subtle.  My initial impression was that this book was going to push at issues of technology and the environment, but, by the end, I was confused  about what the message really was.  Okay, I’m pretty sure the message was that humans suck and only really care about their own happiness and entertainment, even when they know it comes at a great cost.  That might be more disturbing than the thought that the author just lost the thread.  Either way, I wasn’t quite satisfied that Aaron didn’t take some action, and I’m not talking about some huge action, which would have been out of character.  A verbal warning about the apparent negatives of Fun! to his nearest and dearest would have satisfied me.  While I’m not sure my high school students will be able to articulate the issue, I do think the book will provoke some discussion, and that is always a good thing.  Overall, this wasn’t my cup of tea, but I can see many of my readers, guys especially, enjoying it.  Language and situations are most appropriate for grades 9+.

I received an ARC from the publishers via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

The Natural History of Us

Standard
The Natural History of Us

Ah, thwarted love.  Can a class project fix the love story that should have been?  In my class it probably would have just resulted in someone being murdered in the back corner of the room, but in fiction, all things are possible.

image

Goodreads Summary

One class assignment. One second chance at love. The school player is all in. Now he needs to win back the sweet commitment girl who’s forever owned his heart.

Justin Carter has a secret. He’s not the total player Fairfield Academy believes him to be. Not really. In fact, he used to be a one-woman guy…and his feelings for her never went away. Too bad he broke her heart three years ago and made sure to ruin any chance she’d ever forgive him.

Peyton Williams is a liar. She pretends to be whole, counting down the days until graduation and helping her parents at the family ranch. But the truth is, she’s done everything she can to get over Justin, and salvation is just around the corner. With graduation one short month away, she’ll soon break free from the painful memories and start her life fresh. Of course, she has to get through working with him on one last assignment first.

For Justin, nothing ever felt as right as being with Peyton, and now that fate’s given him a shot at redemption, he’s determined to make the most of it. And for Peyton…well, Justin Carter has always been her kryptonite.

My Thoughts

The Natural History of Us seems pretty simple on the surface, but the use of dual narrators and alternating timelines makes for a much more complex and satisfying picture of a relationship than expected.  This creates an intimate feel that insures that readers will find themselves quickly invested in the love story between Peyton and Justin, but also in the characters as individuals.  Developing a relationship with this much detail means there wasn’t a lot of action outside of their encounters, but I didn’t feel the story suffered for it.  I was pleased that there was drama, but it was not over-the-top.  It felt like a believable romance, and I think YA readers always respond well to realism.  I did think the prose felt awkward for the first few chapters. Peyton’s narrative voice seemed to wobble and her reactions felt off, but she soon found her pace and I didn’t notice it for long.  This is the second in a series, but I read it as a standalone and had no trouble following the story.  Overall, I think this is a book my high school readers will enjoy, particularly those who enjoy contemporary YA romance writers like Miranda Kenneally.  I’m adding it to my classroom library wish list.  Language and some scenes of sensuality make this most appropriate for high school readers.

I received an ARC from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

In Real Life by Jessica Love is the perfect book for the Comfort Zone Square in you.

Standard
In Real Life by Jessica Love is the perfect book for the Comfort Zone Square in you.

I finished this love story in just a few hours, and it made me happy.  Hannah is a rule follower, and a bit of a comfort zone square, and I completely related to her.  I loved the fact that she gets the nerve to finally break a few rules and learns that the results aren’t always what she expects but you have to learn to embrace new things if you want to grow.  Great message wrapped in reality.

image

 Goodreads Summary

Hannah Cho and Nick Cooper have been best friends since 8th grade. They talk for hours on the phone, regularly shower each other with presents, and know everything there is to know about one another.

There’s just one problem: Hannah and Nick have never actually met.

Hannah has spent her entire life doing what she’s supposed to, but when her senior year spring break plans get ruined by a rule-breaker, she decides to break a rule or two herself. She impulsively decides to road trip to Las Vegas, her older sister and BFF in tow, to surprise Nick and finally declare her more-than-friend feelings for him.

Hannah’s surprise romantic gesture backfires when she gets to Vegas and finds out that Nick has been keeping some major secrets. Hannah knows the real Nick can’t be that different from the online Nick she knows and loves, but now she only has night in Sin City to figure out what her feelings for Nick really are, all while discovering how life can change when you break the rules every now and then.

 My Thoughts

I have always enjoyed books that throw wrenches into the best laid plans (or last minute plans that sound awesome), so I liked the funny missteps and quirky moments in this story.  Most of the book focuses on an inability to express feelings and the uncertainty of sharing feelings you can’t be sure are returned.  I think we’ve all been there, done that, so I don’t think it is hard for anyone to find some empathy for the situation.  I did think the book moved quickly, but there weren’t really any moments where I thought the pace was detrimental to the development of relationships.  Most of the hard work in falling in love happened before the story really begins, so I don’t think anyone else will feel that way either.  Overall, this was a cute and funny story that I think YA readers of contemporary romance will enjoy.  This is a book I would easily suggest to some of my reluctant readers because it is engaging, easy to read, and fast paced.  I am adding it to my high school classroom library, and I think it is appropriate for high school readers.  There is some drinking and some kissing, but for the most part, I don’t think it will corrupt the youth of today.

I received an ARC from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

Becca Fitzpatrick’s Dangerous Lies is a surprisingly satisfying YA contemporary, especially since or despite the fact that I think her Hush,Hush series is unreadable

Standard
Becca Fitzpatrick’s Dangerous Lies is a surprisingly satisfying YA contemporary, especially since or despite the fact that I think her Hush,Hush series is unreadable

I wasn’t a fan of this author’s paranormal books, but I really enjoyed this YA Suspense/Thriller.   I thought that there was a nice complexity to the plot, characters, and conflicts. Underlying themes of family, friendship, responsibility and guilt added depth.  I think fans of Becca Fitzpatrick will be pleasantly surprised, and her naysayers will be pretty surprised as well.  I recommend this book to readers who enjoy YA contemporary mysteries rand romance as well as those who enjoy small town life and all the complexities that accompany it.

image

Goodreads Summary

A teen is forced to make a fresh start after witnessing a violent crime—but love and danger find her anyway in this novel from Becca Fitzpatrick, the New York Times bestselling author of the Hush, Hush saga.

Stella Gordon is not her real name. Thunder Basin, Nebraska, is not her real home. This is not her real life.

After witnessing a lethal crime, Stella Gordon is sent to the middle of nowhere for her own safety before she testifies against the man she saw kill her mother’s drug dealer.

But Stella was about to start her senior year with the boyfriend she loves. How can she be pulled away from the only life she knows and expected to start a new one in Nebraska? Stella chafes at her protection and is rude to everyone she meets. She’s not planning on staying long, so why be friendly? Then she meets Chet Falconer and it becomes harder to keep her guard up, even as her guilt about having to lie to him grows.

As Stella starts to feel safer, the real threat to her life increases—because her enemies are actually closer than she thinks…

My Thoughts

As a narrative voice, I liked Stella, and she felt like a real teen dealing with the big issues of being ripped out of her own life.  She is initially bratty, but I think most of us would act in the same way (let’s be real – I pout when there aren’t any cold cokes in the fridge or when the lunch menu at school is wrong, so leaving my past, present, and planned future behind would probably involve an all out temper tantrum).   Once readers start peeling her layers back, it is clear that she is not a bad person, but a girl who desperately is clinging to the only security she has had for the last few years.  She cares about people and has a righteous anger when she thinks someone is being a bully.  It is that characteristic tendency that plays havoc and creates both internal and external conflict that I thought was both believable and compelling.  Chet is the love interest in the story, and most readers will fall quickly and hard for this reformed bad boy of a cowboy.  He isn’t too country, and he has a backstory that let’s you know he can get up to some antics, but he is the guy you want to cuddle up with in the back of a pick up truck.  While there is some concern about a love triangle, the other guy is in the Witness Protection Program, too, and readers are told up front that Stella won’t be able to contact him ever again, so the battle between the boys really takes place in Stella’s mind – I honestly didn’t really consider this a love triangle at all. The story was nicely paced to develop relationships and allow time for a believable epiphany, but it also maintained a nice tension by giving Stella an adversary in her new setting in addition to the drug dealer who wants to snuff her out back in Phillie.  There are some characters I wanted to know a little more about, but I thought the resolution was satisfying, and I think most readers will as well.  I started this book late at night, and two hours had passed when I looked up again!  Clearly, it reads easily and the story and characters are absorbing.  Language and situations are appropriate for high school readers, but I think adult readers of YA will enjoy this book as well.

I received an ARC from the publisher via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.

Need by Joelle Charbonneau is a YA suspense/thriller that is hard to read but hard to put down

Standard
Need by Joelle Charbonneau is a YA suspense/thriller that is hard to read but hard to put down

Need is a really edgy and engaging read!  I read it cover to cover in one sitting despite my growing horror because I just had to know who and what was behind this awful scheme.  I’m not going to tell you this is great literature or try to convince you that there are lessons about morality and social media to be learned through this story.  This is absolutely a book you read for entertainment of the rubbernecking variety, and I certainly got an eyeful.

Need will be released Tuesday, November 3, 2015.

image

Goodreads Summary

“No one gets something for nothing. We all should know better.”

Teenagers at Wisconsin’s Nottawa High School are drawn deeper into a social networking site that promises to grant their every need . . . regardless of the consequences. Soon the site turns sinister, with simple pranks escalating to malicious crimes. The body count rises. In this chilling YA thriller, the author of the best-selling Testing trilogy examines not only the dark side of social media, but the dark side of human nature.

My Thoughts

The story is a series of narratives that are all held together by the protagonist, Kaylee.  Her situation and bungled attempts to help make her someone readers will quickly empathize with, and her inherent goodness makes her likeable.  Some readers will be overwhelmed by the large cast of characters in this book.  Breathe.  Most of them aren’t really important and are stereotyped to give you a fast idea of who they are without wasting a lot of time – exactly the purpose of stereotype in writing.  Relax. Just read.  The major players will start to distinguish themselves fairly quickly, so just wait to start memorizing every name and need.  This is such a smart way to set up this book because it really creates suspense and adds a lot of dramatic irony – it doesn’t take long for you to figure out who this is going to play badly for.  The joy is reading to see if it happens like you expect, and it is paced to deliver.  It doesn’t fool around – rewards come quickly and there are no real lulls in the action. However, I did have a problem with the resolution.  I’m not a big fan of the villian confessional monologue as a resolution, but, again, it is a device that gets a job done quickly.  It was in keeping with the whole teen slasher flick feel of the rest of the story, so it was satisfactory enough to wrap up the fun, but it wasn’t as great as it could have been.  Overall, I think this will be a big hit with my high school readers, and I see it making the rounds based on word of mouth.  I just need folks to practice reading, so I can ignore the violence, selfishness, and awful picture of humanity it portrays (to be fair, these behaviors are appropriately censured and punished).  I especially see this being popular with reluctant readers because it is hard to resist.  Situations make this most appropriate for high school readers.

I received an ARC from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

Heartache and Other Natural Shocks

Standard
Heartache and Other Natural Shocks

This book is about heartache (duh), but it might not be the heartache you expect.  I thought I had this book pegged as an insipid teen romance, and there won’t be much to convince you that there is anything more for the first 30% of the book.  Readers who stick this one out will be glad they did because this is really about the bigger heartaches of growing up and realizing the people you thought you could always depend on and trust might be changed by their own heartaches and natural disasters (see what I did there?).  This was a four star read.

image

Goodreads Summary

A page-turning young-adult novel told from the alternating voices of two witty, sharp-edged teenage girls who compete for a role in the school production of Hamlet and for the same local bad boy, in a game of deception, betrayal, and sword play.

When fifteen-year-old Julia Epstein and her Anglophone family flee Montreal in October 1970, she struggles to adjust to a new life in the suburban wasteland of North York, Toronto. Next door lives Carla Cabrielli, who works her “assets” and knows how to get what she wants. Julia and Carla get on a collision course, not only for the same role in the school production of Hamlet, but also for the leading man – sword-wielding bad boy and sex magnet, Ian Slater. Heartache and Other Natural Shocks explores teen rivalry. When events take a dangerous turn, both Julia and Carla become vulnerable to deception and betrayal. Full of unexpected twist and turns, Glenda Leznoff’s unique novel marks the debut of an important new voice in young-adult fiction.

My Thoughts

I’m going to tell it like it is.  The beginning of this book was a trial for me.   Carla is a mean girl and she made me want to punch her in the throat.  It was bad enough that I stopped reading and didn’t pick this back up until my obligation to review became pressing.  I’m glad I gave this book a second chance.  It was a lot more than just a light read about teen love.  There was a lot of depth about love in general and about growing up and getting wiser to the world in the process.  I never really liked Carla, but at some point, I began to see her vulnerabilities and how they were driving her just like we are all driven. Julia, on the other hand, wasn’t a hard character for me to relate to from the start, but she got fierce near the end of the book, and I think lots of readers will want to experience that moment.  Secondary characters are nuanced and some are delightful.  I certainly picked up on a few themes we all could benefit from remembering – being a knockout doesn’t always guarantee a happy romance, and even though something has a pretty facade, you never know what is really going on beneath the window dressing.    I think this book has universal appeal, despite the 70’s setting which can be quite distancing and despite Carla the Obnoxious, because it really deals with that moment in time when you realize that your parents may not be the people you always thought they were.  It’s a tough moment to see one of your idols eclipsed, and it is an inevitable moment in most of our lives.  As an English teacher, I particularly enjoyed the way Hamlet was a pivotal part of the story – a lot of times school assignments in YA fiction feel fabricated from a required reading list, but this one actually incorporates the play in a meaningful way that will pique reader interest in both works.  Overall, I think this is a very thoughtful and moving book, and I would recommend it to my high school readers.  I would love to pair it with a Hamlet as a class assignment, but the sensuality is a little too detailed and the language is a little too much for a required reading, even if I consider it appropriate for high school readers.  I think adults can enjoy this book as much as the target audience, particularly those who feel nostalgic about the 1970’s, but they will have to navigate through the first part of the book, which might be initially difficult for more discerning readers.

I received an ARC from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

We’ll Never Be Apart – YA that is part contemporary gothic mystery and part psychological horror

Standard
We’ll Never Be Apart – YA that is part contemporary gothic mystery and part psychological horror

V.C. Andrews was one of my favorite authors when I was a teen, and I loved and loathed the drama she gave me time and again.  While she isn’t as popular with my high school readers as she should be, there are books filling that gothic, twisty horror void in YA today.  We’ll Never Be Apart is going to fit into that category.  Part mystery, and part psychological horror, this book will definitely keep readers engaged, but never sure which twin is going to triumph in the end.

image

Goodreads Summary

Murder.

Fire.

Revenge.

That’s all seventeen-year-old Alice Monroe thinks about. Committed to a mental ward at Savage Isle, Alice is haunted by memories of the fire that killed her boyfriend, Jason. A blaze her twin sister Cellie set. But when Chase, a mysterious, charismatic patient, agrees to help her seek vengeance, Alice begins to rethink everything. Writing out the story of her troubled past in a journal, she must confront hidden truths.

Is the one person she trusts only telling her half the story? Nothing is as it seems in this edge-of-your-seat psychological thriller from the debut author Emiko Jean.

My Thoughts

The premise of We’ll Never Be Apart hints at a rather dark story – a mental hospital, pyromania, a bad twin – and the truth is that this book is almost as gothic as a V.C. Andrews classic (and I mean that in the very best of ways).  Alice is a really compelling character because she so easily becomes someone you trust despite the fact that she is in a mental hospital.  Readers will quickly recognize that she is a casualty of her unstable twin, Cellie.  Part of what is so engaging about the story is that you want to see Alice triumph over the evils of her sister, but you aren’t convinced she will.  Chase, a fellow patient, is another character that readers will feel pretty confident is not mentally ill.  He is charming in a bad boy way, and his relationship with Alice feels like a healthy step for her.  My  problem with Chase really didn’t surface until the end when I felt like his motives come across as somewhat contrived, but I don’t think other readers will necessarily see it that way.  The plot is well paced to maintain the mystery and still draw a developing picture of characters and the situation.  This is primarily the result of a smart choice in the narrative structure, which alternates between the present and Alice’s journal entries about her past.  I did think that the resolution was a little rushed and it glossed over big issues that I thought needed a little more attention, but I was satisfied by the ending.  The story is full of rather horrific incidents and a few expected revelations, and sometimes I felt dread about what was going to show up in the next chapter, but I see my high school readers enjoying it.  I would recommend it to fans of When We Were Liars and readers who enjoy twisty psychological suspense/thrillers. Language and situations are appropriate for high school readers.

I received an ARC from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

Natalie Richard’s Third YA Contemporary Mystery/Romance – My Secret to Tell

Standard
Natalie Richard’s Third YA Contemporary Mystery/Romance – My Secret to Tell

I’ve read several books by this author, and she seems to be getting more mainstream with each passing tale.  I’m afraid this one was a little too mainstream and predictable for me to really rave about, but it is a decent contemporary mystery for YA readers.  I don’t think it will really grab the attention of more discerning mystery readers because it just feels average in its plot and execution, but it is still a four star read as far as this genre goes.   Bells and whistles are sometimes overkill anyway.

image

Goodreads Review

Emmie’s had a crush on her best friend’s brother forever. Deacon is the town bad boy who’s always in trouble, but she sees his soft side when he volunteers with her at the local animal shelter. She doesn’t think he’s dangerous…until he shows up in her bedroom with blood on his hands.

Deacon’s father has been violently assaulted and Deacon is suspect number one. Emmie’s smart enough to know how this looks, but she also knows Deacon’s biggest secret—he’s paralyzed by the sight of blood. She’s sure he didn’t do this. Or did he? Because even Deacon’s own sister thinks he’s guilty…

My Thoughts

Initially, I found the story confusing because it opens in the middle of a crisis.  It doesn’t take long to start sorting people out, but I feel like readers need to know they need to stick it out a couple of chapters before they give up on the story.  This is a decent YA suspense/thriller with plenty of suspects and red herrings thrown in.  I did guess parts of the puzzle, but I couldn’t put them together until the very end because this one was a little twisty.  The romance is well balanced with both the action and the protagonist’s struggles with her parents expectations, and I thought the subplots worked well together.  The characters were okay, but I felt like secondary characters really lacked the development they needed to help me guess more about the situation.  To be fair, most of the secondary characters played only peripheral roles, though.  The overall pacing was fast enough to keep the suspense going, and I was engaged enough to finish it in a day.  Having read Natalie Richards other books, I was a little surprised at how conventional the story was – this is probably her most mainstream book, but I don’t think it is her most interesting (Gone Too Far is).  Essentially, this is a little Vanilla for my expectations, but I think more readers will be able to enjoy the story.  I would recommend it to my YA suspense/thriller readers.  It is going on my classroom library wish list. Language and situations are appropriate for grades 7+.

I received an ARC from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

The Secret Fire – the battle between good and evil comes to modern day England

Standard
The Secret Fire – the battle between good and evil comes to modern day England

It isn’t often that I find YA paranormal that is actually set in the contemporary world, so I was excited to see The Secret Fire didn’t linger in the past or seek refuge in an alternate or parallel universe.  It is firmly set in modern day England and France, which means we get mini skirts and motorcycles mixed in with the magic.  Unfortunately, I didn’t end up appreciating it as much as I had anticipated, but I think there is a good chance that other readers will, particularly those in the YA demographic.

image

Goodreads Summary

French teen Sacha Winters can’t die. He can throw himself off a roof, be stabbed, even shot, and he will always survive. Until the day when history and ancient enmities dictate that he must die. Worse still, his death will trigger something awful. Something deadly. And that day is closing in.

Taylor Montclair is a normal English girl, hanging out with her friends and studying for exams, until she starts shorting out the lights with her brain. She’s also the only person on earth who can save Sacha.
There’s only one problem: the two of them have never met. They live hundreds of miles apart and powerful forces will stop at nothing to keep them apart.

They have eight weeks to find each other.

Will they survive long enough to save the world?

My Thoughts

The Secret Fire wasn’t a great reading experience for me – I wasn’t particularly invested, and I drifted away from it several times to read other things, but I don’t think my experience will necessarily be yours. There is a lot of action, especially once the setting and characters are established.  There is an engaging premise based on a curse made generations before the story begins.  There is a secret battle going on between good and evil forces that sweeps up the two main characters.  There is magic and there is mystery.  I think I just wasn’t in the right frame of mind.  I absolutely think there is an audience for this book.  Taylor is an average girl who excels at schoolwork. She is pleasantly surprised to find herself dating the hottest guy in school and those strange electric fluctuations surely have nothing to do with her.  She is a bit of a Pollyanna, erring on the side of perfection, but I think most YA readers will like her well enough.  Sasha is an image of a bad boy but with all the chivalry a girl could want. He is a bit of a stereotype, but he has the better character arc, and I think he will be appealing to teen girls.  The inciting incident – a class assignment that comes across as too awkward and contrived- and the pacing of Taylor and Sasha’s relationship- it dragged on for me but still felt underdeveloped- are the two things I can clearly identify as a problem for me as a reader.  I don’t necessarily think they will be an issue for you.  If you enjoy paranormal YA in a contemporary setting, you might just find this book really grabs you.

I received an ARC from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.