Tag Archives: coming of age

Kill the Boy Band – Dark YA humor about being a fan 

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Kill the Boy Band – Dark YA humor about being a fan 

In the vein of some of the great eighties teen movies where a little innocent fun and rebellion turns into a major cluster that has to be covered up before the parents come home, Kill the Boy Band is funny and improbable and a great escape read.  It reminded me of my New Kids On the Block days (fourth grade) when I championed Danny because he was the one member I thought might be unattractive enough to be attainable – I really did think that.  I still have a giant pin of his head that I used to wear on my jean jacket.  No.  I won’t sell it to you, but you can experience the angst and calculated admiration I felt by reading this dark and funny YA.

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Goodreads Summary

From debut author Goldy Moldavsky, the story of four superfan friends whose devotion to their favorite boy band has darkly comical and murderous results.

Okay, so just know from the start that it wasn’t supposed to go like this. All we wanted was to get near The Ruperts, our favorite boy band.

We didn’t mean to kidnap one of the guys. It kind of, sort of happened that way. But now he’s tied up in our hotel room. And the worst part of all, it’s Rupert P. All four members of The Ruperts might have the same first name, but they couldn’t be more different. And Rupert P. is the biggest flop out of the whole group.

We didn’t mean to hold hostage a member of The Ruperts, I swear. At least, I didn’t. We are fans. Okay, superfans who spend all of our free time tweeting about the boys and updating our fan tumblrs. But so what, that’s what you do when you love a group so much it hurts.

How did it get this far? Who knows. I mean midterms are coming up. I really do not have time to go to hell.

My Thoughts

There will be crybaby reviewers who will be offended for the perceived insults about fandom or whatever “stereotype” they most closely relate to, but those people have missed the point.  Yes, it’s over the top, but it’s really about those moments when the narrator awakens to those awful coming of age realizations that we all have.  Your perception of a friendship isn’t always the truth. People will sometimes use you to further their own agenda. You often feel passionate about something you will later feel embarrassed about. You are not a unique snowflake having a unique experience – yes, this really is just a phase that almost everyone else has or will experience in some form. Your idols are not as great in real life as in your imagination.  All of these little gems and more are wrapped up in an over-the-top, dark, teen girl version of a The Hangover type of scenario.  I thought it was a lot of fun.  I don’t care how reasonable the scenario is because it wasn’t suppose to be.  Some language, sexual references, and dark situations, but I think it is appropriate for high school readers.  Adult readers who once adored NKOTB or ‘N Sync and fans of Ferris Bueller’s Day Off will get a good laugh as well.

I received an ARC from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

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Summer of Sloane

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Summer of Sloane

If you are looking for a little drama in your next YA contemporary, you would be hard pressed to find a book with more drama than Summer of Sloane.  The narrator, Sloane, learns her best friend is knocked up by her boyfriend in the first few pages, a revelation that kicks off a summer full of eye-opening situations about love, betrayal, forgiveness and trust.  Too much drama for me, so I gave it three stars, but other reviewers averaged a four star rating on Goodreads.

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Goodreads Summary

Warm Hawaiian sun. Lazy beach days. Flirty texts with her boyfriend back in Seattle.

These are the things seventeen-year-old Sloane McIntyre pictured when she imagined the summer she’d be spending at her mom’s home in Hawaii with her twin brother, Penn. Instead, after learning an unthinkable secret about her boyfriend, Tyler, and best friend, Mick, all she has is a fractured hand and a completely shattered heart.
Once she arrives in Honolulu, though, Sloane hopes that Hawaii might just be the escape she needs. With beach bonfires, old friends, exotic food, and the wonders of a waterproof cast, there’s no reason Sloane shouldn’t enjoy her summer. And when she meets Finn McAllister, the handsome son of a hotel magnate who doesn’t always play by the rules, she knows he’s the perfect distraction from everything that’s so wrong back home.
But it turns out a measly ocean isn’t nearly enough to stop all the emails, texts, and voicemails from her ex-boyfriend and ex-best friend, desperate to explain away their betrayal. And as her casual connection with Finn grows deeper, Sloane’s carefree summer might not be as easy to find as she’d hoped. Weighing years of history with Mick and Tyler against their deception, and the delicate possibility of new love, Sloane must decide when to forgive, and when to live for herself.

My Thoughts

The problem for me as a reader is that the dramatics seemed to eat up much of the time that should have been spent developing characters and relationships.  Sloane never really seems to get past her self centered, woe is me funk.  The lessons were there and the knowledge was for the taking, but I’m not convinced she really got it in the end.  This might be due to the fact that the ending felt rushed, which is a shame because there was an attempt not to tie everything into an unrealistic neat bow as the book closed (kudos for that).  I think what Sloane really needed – some real thinking time – was pushed to the side for the sake of a romance I wasn’t sold on.  Maybe the thinking time was there but felt distorted because it was more implied by time measurements than any real soliloquies.  That being said, I don’t think readers of the contemporary YA romance will be hugely put off by the things that bothered me.  My high school students like books that are full of drama like this, and I think they will be content with the ending.  I would purchase this book for my classroom library, and I can see it getting a lot of word of mouth recommendations.  Language and situations are appropriate for high school readers.

I received an ARC from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

Geoff Herbach’s Anything You Want – as thoughtful as it is hilarious

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Geoff Herbach’s Anything You Want – as thoughtful as it is hilarious

If you can tolerate the lovable idiot who narrates this book, you will find a pretty amazing story inside.  I do not tolerate lovable idiots easily, so trust me when I say this – Anything You Want is definitely worth the read.  It is so funny and so full of heart, and I can’t imagine a smarter way to entertain and still engage readers in thoughtful commentary on big life lessons.  I do have to say that this is one time I really scored a book a lot higher than other critics.  I gave it five stars, but it only has a three star average on Goodreads – again, you have to commit to the lovable idiot and actually finish the book to see what I saw.

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Goodreads Summary

Expect a bundle of joy—er, trouble—in this hilarious, heartwarming story from the award-winning author of Stupid Fast Geoff Herbach

Taco’s mom always said, “Today is the best day of your life, and tomorrow will be even better.” That was hard to believe the day she died of cancer and when Taco’s dad had to move up north for work, but he sure did believe it when Maggie Corrigan agreed to go with him to junior prom. Taco loves Maggie- even more than the tacos that earned him his nickname. And she loves him right back.

Except all that love? It gets Maggie pregnant. Everyone else may be freaking out, but Taco can’t wait to have a real family again. He just has to figure out what it means to be a dad and how to pass calculus. And then there’s getting Maggie’s parents to like him. Because it would be so much easier for them to be together if he didn’t have to climb the side of the Corrigans’ house to see her…

My Thoughts

Taco’s relentless enthusiasm and optimism keep the story from getting too heavy without minimizing the issues.  This book really tackles universal themes and truths about growing up and being a family, and Taco’s clueless perspective is sometimes exhausting, but it makes these themes a lot more palatable to the YA reader.  I see this being a big hit in my high school classroom library, and a book that both guys and gals can embrace.  It is exactly the kind of book I want to hand my readers because they will come for the party that is Taco, but they will stay for the business that is real life.  It is definitely going on my classroom library wish list.  Language and situations make this most appropriate for high school readers, but I bet there are many adults who will still get a real kick out of this read.

I received an ARC from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

The 13th Continuum

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The 13th Continuum

The 13th Continuum is another YA dystopian, meaning it didn’t add much to the genre.  Weak characters and a lack of logic made for a rather dull read.  Die hard dystopian devotees will still probably find it hard to pass up, but if you are over it, you won’t miss much here.  As usual, there are other reviewers who thought it topped sliced bread, but I gave it three stars.

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Goodreads Summary

One thousand years after a cataclysmic event leaves humanity on the brink of extinction, the survivors take refuge in continuums designed to sustain the human race until repopulation of Earth becomes possible. Against this backdrop, a group of young friends in the underwater Thirteenth Continuum dream about life outside their totalitarian existence, an idea that has been outlawed for centuries. When a shocking discovery turns the dream into a reality, they must decide if they will risk their own extinction to experience something no one has for generations, the Surface.

My Thoughts

While I liked the idea of this book, I didn’t actually like the book. First, it didn’t feel polished. In particular, the pacing seemed off. I’m not sure if it was the amount of detail that was included in the social structure of the world or if it was really the result of trying to establish relationships between characters, but the fallout was that it slowed the story to the point that I began to lose interest. I thought it was smart for the author to incorporate the second colony because the appearance of Aero recaptured my interest for a while.

Second, the plot was problematic for me. I was never really clear about what motivated Aero’s colony, so I struggled to find the logic in the conflict.

Finally, I never really connected with any of the characters. Myra was an adequate character, but she didn’t really have any sparkle or wit about her. I liked her dedication to her family, but she was bland. Aero was a little more interesting because he was contemplating the negatives in his society but he was also able to show the advantages he felt he gained from the system. I found that much more intriguing than a character placed in an obviously flawed society. The relationship between these two was way too accelerated and I didn’t understand the logic behind that. Overall, this just wasn’t a book I connected with, and I don’t think it is engaging enough to keep my high school students interested, though the premise will certainly catch their attention. Language and situations are appropriate for middle and high school readers.

I received an ARC from the publisher via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.

 

The End of Fun by Sean McGinty was kind of fun, but it was also stressful

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The End of Fun by Sean McGinty was kind of fun, but it was also stressful

To be honest, this book kind of wore me out.  I’m not sure if it was just the challenge of dealing with a narrator who has the judgement of a three year old or if it was the format, which required a lot of product placement.  Both of those elements are essential to the humor and the strong narrative voice in the story, though, and are actually what I think many YA readers will find appealing.

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Goodreads Summary

Everyday reality is a drag™.

FUN®—the latest in augmented reality—is fun (yay!) but it’s also frustrating, glitchy and dangerously addictive (boo!). Just when everyone else is getting on, seventeen-year-old Aaron O’Faolain wants off.

But first, he has to complete his Application for Termination, and in order to do that he has to deal with his History—not to mention the present, including his grandfather’s suicide and a series of clues that may (or may not) lead to buried treasure. As he attempts to unravel the mystery, Aaron is sidetracked again…and again. Shadowed by his virtual “best friend” Homie, Aaron struggles with love, loss, dog bites, werewolf pills, community theater, wild horses, wildfires and the fact (deep breath) that actual reality can sometimes surprise you.

Sean McGinty’s strikingly profound and laugh-out-loud funny debut unearths a world that is eerily familiar, yet utterly original. Discover what it means to come to the end of fun.

My Thoughts

Aaron is an impulsive idiot, but he is trying to move in the right direction, and his attempts at taking charge of his own fate are often disastrous and hilarious.  I liked him, but I felt like he needed a babysitter.  As far as the cast of supporting characters went, they were just as likeable, if often as misguided as Aaron.  If you are looking for a book to make you laugh, this is probably a good choice.  But I, of course, want something more than just laughs, so I was disappointed that the satire of the story was so subtle.  My initial impression was that this book was going to push at issues of technology and the environment, but, by the end, I was confused  about what the message really was.  Okay, I’m pretty sure the message was that humans suck and only really care about their own happiness and entertainment, even when they know it comes at a great cost.  That might be more disturbing than the thought that the author just lost the thread.  Either way, I wasn’t quite satisfied that Aaron didn’t take some action, and I’m not talking about some huge action, which would have been out of character.  A verbal warning about the apparent negatives of Fun! to his nearest and dearest would have satisfied me.  While I’m not sure my high school students will be able to articulate the issue, I do think the book will provoke some discussion, and that is always a good thing.  Overall, this wasn’t my cup of tea, but I can see many of my readers, guys especially, enjoying it.  Language and situations are most appropriate for grades 9+.

I received an ARC from the publishers via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

The Natural History of Us

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The Natural History of Us

Ah, thwarted love.  Can a class project fix the love story that should have been?  In my class it probably would have just resulted in someone being murdered in the back corner of the room, but in fiction, all things are possible.

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Goodreads Summary

One class assignment. One second chance at love. The school player is all in. Now he needs to win back the sweet commitment girl who’s forever owned his heart.

Justin Carter has a secret. He’s not the total player Fairfield Academy believes him to be. Not really. In fact, he used to be a one-woman guy…and his feelings for her never went away. Too bad he broke her heart three years ago and made sure to ruin any chance she’d ever forgive him.

Peyton Williams is a liar. She pretends to be whole, counting down the days until graduation and helping her parents at the family ranch. But the truth is, she’s done everything she can to get over Justin, and salvation is just around the corner. With graduation one short month away, she’ll soon break free from the painful memories and start her life fresh. Of course, she has to get through working with him on one last assignment first.

For Justin, nothing ever felt as right as being with Peyton, and now that fate’s given him a shot at redemption, he’s determined to make the most of it. And for Peyton…well, Justin Carter has always been her kryptonite.

My Thoughts

The Natural History of Us seems pretty simple on the surface, but the use of dual narrators and alternating timelines makes for a much more complex and satisfying picture of a relationship than expected.  This creates an intimate feel that insures that readers will find themselves quickly invested in the love story between Peyton and Justin, but also in the characters as individuals.  Developing a relationship with this much detail means there wasn’t a lot of action outside of their encounters, but I didn’t feel the story suffered for it.  I was pleased that there was drama, but it was not over-the-top.  It felt like a believable romance, and I think YA readers always respond well to realism.  I did think the prose felt awkward for the first few chapters. Peyton’s narrative voice seemed to wobble and her reactions felt off, but she soon found her pace and I didn’t notice it for long.  This is the second in a series, but I read it as a standalone and had no trouble following the story.  Overall, I think this is a book my high school readers will enjoy, particularly those who enjoy contemporary YA romance writers like Miranda Kenneally.  I’m adding it to my classroom library wish list.  Language and some scenes of sensuality make this most appropriate for high school readers.

I received an ARC from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

Rebel of the Sands is my newest YA obsession

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Rebel of the Sands is my newest YA obsession

I really, really enjoyed this book, and I really didn’t expect that.  Lots of books that try to combine the western and the fantasy genre just don’t work – my standards are high for both, and when you combine the two, I’m downright looking for issues.  However, Rebel of the Sands, with its Wild West meets Arabian Nights feel, is spot on.  If you don’t believe me, just sample it.  I ignored this offering, but I took the publisher up on its sneak peek two days before publication.  Big mistake. I spent two days desperate to get back to this book.  I didn’t even flinch when I preordered it and paid $11.  I needed this book, and I wasn’t disappointed.  Get out there and find it because it really is a five star read.

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Goodreads Summary

She’s more gunpowder than girl—and the fate of the desert lies in her hands.

Mortals rule the desert nation of Miraji, but mystical beasts still roam the wild and barren wastes, and rumor has it that somewhere, djinni still practice their magic. But there’s nothing mystical or magical about Dustwalk, the dead-end town that Amani can’t wait to escape from.
Destined to wind up “wed or dead,” Amani’s counting on her sharpshooting skills to get her out of Dustwalk. When she meets Jin, a mysterious and devastatingly handsome foreigner, in a shooting contest, she figures he’s the perfect escape route. But in all her years spent dreaming of leaving home, she never imagined she’d gallop away on a mythical horse, fleeing the murderous Sultan’s army, with a fugitive who’s wanted for treason. And she’d never have predicted she’d fall in love with him…or that he’d help her unlock the powerful truth of who she really is.

My Thoughts

Rebel of the Sands is populated by characters I easily embraced.  They aren’t perfect, but they have the potential for greatness hovering in hidden places.  I particularly liked Amani because she is so tough, independent, and single-minded.  Her journey from that girl to the one who will change everything for her kingdom is smart and compelling.  This journey really is the heart of this book because it is essential to themes about independence and friendship, selfishness and selflessness.  I liked this message, and I think there are many readers out there who will as well.

The plot was really better than I could have imagined, and, sure, there are elements of the western and Arabian mythology, but neither of those overwhelmed the story.  Do not skip this book just because your dad had westerns on a loop when you wanted to watch cartoons as a kid.  Do not skip this book because you hate the word Djinn (I know I can’t be the only person who feels aggressive when they see the spelling of that word.  It grates like nails on a chalkboard).  I hate Alladin with all the pent up ugly that is in me, and I still loved this book.  I know it will appeal to a wide audience because it has characters with heart who are fighting for what is right against a government driven by greed – you know you love that stuff – it’s what kept you secretly watching The Hunger Games movies and The Divergent movies even though you know that the last one is going to blow chunks because we all know that book ticked off the entire population of YA girls on Earth (well, that one might have been about that hot guy, but, still).

If you love Sarah J. Maas’ Throne of Glass series, with the tough-as-nails female protagonist, or if you enjoyed the travels and travails of the characters in books like Stone Rider or Walk on Earth a Stranger, you owe it to yourself to give this book a chance.

I’ve lead you to water, Kiddies.  It’s up to you to drink.

I did receive a sneak peek of this book from the publisher via NetGalley, but I bought myself a copy of the book and I’m buying my beloved students a copy, so this is my real and honest opinion (It always is, anyway).

The Abyss Surrounds Us has a wildly original premise that I just couldn’t pass up

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The Abyss Surrounds Us has a wildly original premise that I just couldn’t pass up

I’m betting that YA scifi/fantasy fans will have a hard time not sampling this book out of curiosity.  I’m betting more than a few of them will stay for the ride.  I certainly couldn’t resist it because I loved the concept of sea monsters trained to defend against pirates, and I loved the complicated internal struggle that the plot creates for the protagonist.  While I did enjoy most of the book, I struggled with a few parts, so this is a three star read for me, but will that really stop anyone from picking up a book where sea monsters fight pirates?  No.  No, it will not.

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Goodreads Summary

For Cassandra Leung, bossing around sea monsters is just the family business. She’s been a Reckoner trainer-in-training ever since she could walk, raising the genetically-engineered beasts to defend ships as they cross the pirate-infested NeoPacific. But when the pirate queen Santa Elena swoops in on Cas’s first solo mission and snatches her from the bloodstained decks, Cas’s dream of being a full-time trainer seems dead in the water.

There’s no time to mourn. Waiting for her on the pirate ship is an unhatched Reckoner pup. Santa Elena wants to take back the seas with a monster of her own, and she needs a proper trainer to do it. She orders Cas to raise the pup, make sure he imprints on her ship, and, when the time comes, teach him to fight for the pirates. If Cas fails, her blood will be the next to paint the sea.

But Cas has fought pirates her entire life. And she’s not about to stop.

My Thoughts

Cassandra is a well developed and complex character who I genuinely liked for her honest response to her bad situation.  She loves and loathes the decisions she has to make, and that makes her feel less like a character and more like a real person.  The secondary characters also had some depth that added a nice element of unpredictability to the plot.  It was easy to see how Cassandra’s initial resolve began to waiver as she learned more about her enemy.  I didn’t particularly care for the romantic relationship for some reason. I thought there was a lot of care taken to give the relationship time and reason to develop, but, in the end, I just didn’t buy it as romantic – friendship, yes, but romantic love, eh.  Other readers might not feel the same way, but I wasn’t sold.  I wasn’t quite happy with the resolution because I was a little confused about what decision Cassandra was making – was she fooled, did she not care, or was she plotting a stealth revenge?  It was a hard twist to take in at the end, but that is something that might bring readers back for a follow up read.  Overall, I think this is a pretty cool concept, and I think my high school readers would find it novel and engaging as well.  Language and situations are appropriate for high school and beyond.

I received an ARC from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

The Serpent King by Jeff Zentner is poignant and thoughtful YA about growing up as an outsider in a small southern town

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The Serpent King by Jeff Zentner is poignant and thoughtful YA about growing up as an outsider in a small southern town

The heartbreaking choices and unfurling promise of growing up are vivid and raw in this clear and insightful read about three outsiders in a small southern town.  Carefully crafted characters and poignant moments with universal resonance make for an emotional and thoughtful story that stuck with me long after I turned the last page.  The plot unerringly focuses on the moments in life, both monumental and minuscule, that force people to stretch and revise their world view.

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Goodreads Summary

Dill has had to wrestle with vipers his whole life—at home, as the only son of a Pentecostal minister who urges him to handle poisonous rattlesnakes, and at school, where he faces down bullies who target him for his father’s extreme faith and very public fall from grace.

He and his fellow outcast friends must try to make it through their senior year of high school without letting the small-town culture destroy their creative spirits and sense of self. Graduation will lead to new beginnings for Lydia, whose edgy fashion blog is her ticket out of their rural Tennessee town. And Travis is content where he is thanks to his obsession with an epic book series and the fangirl turning his reality into real-life fantasy.
Their diverging paths could mean the end of their friendship. But not before Dill confronts his dark legacy to attempt to find a way into the light of a future worth living.

My Thoughts

You are going to recognize these characters.  Maybe they are just people you pass in the hallway at school, or maybe they remind you of yourself, but you will know them from the moment they are introduced.  You’ve read books about characters like Lydia, and her drive and ambition will make her easy to relate to. Travis, too, is a sidekick I’ve seen before, but his simple and complete acceptance of who he is is really a beautiful thing to behold in this book.  Dill, though, he isn’t a familiar character type.  I found him especially fascinating because he gave me some real food for thought about all those boys with dubious origins that seem to have little desire or drive to leave the small towns that ruin them.  It never occurred to me that there might be something else going on, and I’m really glad I got a chance to have a new perspective.  As far as plot, this book is fairly evenly paced, but it is more about character development and relationships than action.  There were some predictable elements, but that is part of telling the truth.  There were also some rather big surprises.  I found myself engrossed, and I think my high school readers will as well.  I do have to say this was a rather bittersweet coming of age story, and while I loved watching these characters grow and evolve, it was a little darker than I expected.  Themes about friendship, being true to yourself, and overcoming obstacles that feel insurmountable add a great deal of depth.  I really enjoyed this book, and it is definitely going on my classroom library wish list.  I would recommend it to both my guy and gal readers, and I think it will be just as engaging for adults as YAs.  Language and situations are appropriate for grades 9+.

I received an ARC from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

Gena Showalter’s YA offering, Firstlife, is the pop ballad version of the age old battle between good and evil

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Gena Showalter’s YA offering, Firstlife, is the pop ballad version of the age old battle between good and evil

So, I own a Miley Cyrus song.  An embarrassing one that is probably from a Hannah Montana album.  When my son saw it in my downloads the other day and began laughing his preteen butt off, I was ashamed.  But I rallied.  You see, See You Again makes me remember what it was like to be so young and uncertain in love, and, By Golly, it’s catchy.  It might be a far cry from high brow, but I enjoy it, so that should count for something.  I kind of feel the same way about this book.  It wasn’t a great literary work, and it might even have been a bad literary work in the scale of things, but I was engaged.  I’m a little embarrassed at how much I was entertained by it, but I did while away a few happy hours in this strange work, and that counts for something.  I gave it three stars.

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Goodreads Summary
ONE CHOICE.

TWO REALMS.

NO SECOND CHANCE.

Tenley “Ten” Lockwood is an average seventeen-year-old girl…who has spent the past thirteen months locked inside the Prynne Asylum. The reason? Not her obsession with numbers, but her refusal to let her parents choose where she’ll live—after she dies.

There is an eternal truth most of the world has come to accept: Firstlife is merely a dress rehearsal, and real life begins after death.

In the Everlife, two realms are in power: Troika and Myriad, longtime enemies and deadly rivals. Both will do anything to recruit Ten, including sending their top Laborers to lure her to their side. Soon, Ten finds herself on the run, caught in a wild tug-of-war between the two realms who will do anything to win the right to her soul. Who can she trust? And what if the realm she’s drawn to isn’t home to the boy she’s falling for? She just has to stay alive long enough to make a decision…

My Thoughts

While Firstlife has sweeping themes about the battle between dark and light and the conflict between individual versus society, serious readers will find it difficult to navigate the fluff.  The first twenty percent of the book is full of unnatural conversational patter that relies heavily on references to testicles.  It is fast, and perhaps funny to the right audience, but it makes it hard to take the concept seriously from the start.  Add in the fact that the main character, Ten, seems more torn about her conflicted attraction to a super hot guy than the actual outcome of the battle for her soul, and this book becomes little more than a pop song rendition of one of literature’s most enduring themes.   Now, I’m a bit of a snob, and it hurts me a little to admit that, despite its shortcomings, I thought Firstlife was pretty engaging.  I didn’t understand the concept completely, but there was just enough there to keep me reading for answers.  There was a lot of suspense because, though I had my clear ideas about which side should win this fight, Ten was stubbornly uncertain until the end.  And while I didn’t care for all of the characters, I have to say that many of them were surprisingly dynamic.  I think the real star of the show was Ten’s nemesis turned ally, Sloan.  Overall, this was an entertaining, if not exactly memorable, read.  Language and innuendo make this most appropriate for high school readers.

I received an ARC from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.