Tag Archives: dystopian

If you liked Red Rising, give Jenny Moyer’s Flashfall a look

Standard
If you liked Red Rising, give Jenny Moyer’s Flashfall a look

Jenny Moyer’s Flashfall had a premise that reminded me of Red Rising, one of my favorite books, so I was pretty excited to get my hands on it.  I wasn’t disappointed.  I definitely got vibes of both Red Rising and The Hunger Games from the opening scenes and the initial situation, but I’m also glad to say that this story really did have something new to offer fans.  There is all the rebellion, action, and adventure I crave, but there is also a fresh storyline with some unexpected developments.  I gave Flashfall four stars, but the more impressive endorsement is that I have had a hard time keeping it in my classroom library.  I recommended it to one kid, and I haven’t seen it on the shelf since – word of mouth has kept it in high demand.  I’m really surprised there hasn’t been bigger buzz about this one, so if you missed it when it published in November, it is worth your time to check it out.

 

Goodreads Summary

Orion is a Subpar, expected to mine the tunnels of Outpost Five, near the deadly flash curtain. For generations, her people have chased cirium—the only element that can shield humanity from the curtain’s radioactive particles. She and her caving partner Dram work the most treacherous tunnel, fighting past flash bats and tunnel gulls, in hopes of mining enough cirium to earn their way into the protected city.

But when newcomers arrive at Outpost Five, Orion uncovers disturbing revelations that make her question everything she thought she knew about life on both sides of the cirium shield. As conditions at the outpost grow increasingly dangerous, it’s up to Orion to forge a way past the flashfall, beyond all boundaries, beyond the world as she knows it. 

My Thoughts

Orion is a strong female protagonist with an admirable goal and a strong protective drive for the people she loves. She is easy to empathize with, and she is flawed enough to be believable.  The relationships in the story are engaging, and the romance is developed slowly enough to feel right.  I think the biggest draw for readers, though, will be the fast pace of the story – the action is pretty constant and the threat is real.  While I feel like the overarching world building is a bit fuzzy – I never quite understood exactly why Orion and her family were being used to mine this particular substance, or even where or when the story was set – I was still quite happy to just enjoy the story.  I will definitely be on the lookout for the sequel.  Fans of dystopia won’t be disappointed.    Language and situations are appropriate for grades 7+, but adult readers of YA can enjoy it as well. 

I received an ARC from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

Advertisements

Children of Icarus by Caighlan Smith – What a find!

Standard
Children of Icarus by Caighlan Smith – What a find!

Look, I saw the cover for Children of Icarus and read the cryptic summary and I seriously thought about passing on it.  What a mistake that would have been!  This is one of my favorite reads of 2016.  I found myself racing through this compelling book, and I ended it questioning how far I would go to get my hands on the second.  The answer would shock you, unless you’ve read it, too.  Reviews have been mixed, but it is interesting to note that even those who didn’t love it acknowledged that it would appeal to fans of the big dystopian hits like The Maze Runner and The Hunger Games.  I gave it five stars, and it will be the first book I purchase for my classroom library this year.

image

Goodreads Summary

It is Clara who is desperate to enter the labyrinth and it is Clara who is bright, strong, and fearless enough to take on any challenge. It is no surprise when she is chosen. But so is the girl who has always lived in her shadow. Together they enter. Within minutes, they are torn apart forever. Now the girl who has never left the city walls must fight to survive in a living nightmare, where one false turn with who to trust means a certain dead end.

My Thoughts

Look, that summary doesn’t give you much.  So . . . In a future society, Icarus is worshipped.  Special children between the ages of ten and sixteen are chosen on the day Icarus fell to go into the labyrinth of Icarus and to ascend as angels.  Except, the labyrinth is definitely not a holy place, and all those kids?  Well, some of them might be angels, but it had nothing to do with Icarus and a lot to do with the nasty truth about what really happens in the labyrinth.

While it reminded me in part of The Maze Runner (mysterious labyrinth with horrifying depths) and it reminded me a bit of Ann Aguire’s Enclave (a primitive society born operating in confusion and fear), it was something all its own and that something was rich and engaging.  The narrator is not the fierce warrior woman, as a matter of fact, she is the forgettable sidekick, and that leaves a lot of room for growth.  The mystery and palpable danger of her situation make it hard to leave her side, even when you need a bathroom break.  The twist at the end left me stunned, and the questions I’m still pondering have me itching to talk about it to anyone who will listen.  I can’t wait to share it with my high school readers.  The fast-paced action and the unique brand of mystery make for a winning combination that I know my students will embrace.  Language and situations are appropriate for high school readers.

I received an ARC from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

Francesca Haig’s The Map of Bones 

Standard
Francesca Haig’s The Map of Bones 

If you are a fan of post apocalyptic YA, you should give Francesca Haig’s The Fire Sermon series a try.  If you are hesitant because of the twin thing, just know that it is a lot less bizarre and a lot more believable than the premise makes it sound.  The second book, The Map of Bones, was one of my most anticipated reads this year.  I won’t lie – it started way too slow for my liking, but, oh, when it picked up, it really picked up.

image

Goodreads Summary

Book Two in the critically acclaimed The Fire Sermon trilogy—The Hunger Games meets Cormac McCarthy’s The Road in this richly imagined post-apocalyptic series by award-winning poet Francesca Haig.

Four hundred years in the future, the Earth has turned primitive following a nuclear fire that has laid waste to civilization and nature. Though the radiation fallout has ended, for some unknowable reason every person is born with a twin. Of each pair, one is an Alpha—physically perfect in every way; and the other an Omega—burdened with deformity, small or large. With the Council ruling an apartheid-like society, Omegas are branded and ostracized while the Alphas have gathered the world’s sparse resources for themselves. Though proclaiming their superiority, for all their effort, Alphas cannot escape one harsh fact: whenever one twin dies, so does the other.

Cass is a rare Omega, one burdened with psychic foresight. While her twin, Zach, gains power on the Alpha Council, she dares to dream the most dangerous dream of all: equality. For daring to envision a world in which Alphas and Omegas live side-by-side as equals, both the Council and the Resistance have her in their sights.

My Thoughts

I was expecting a fast paced and action packed follow up.  I was a little annoyed when I didn’t initially get what I wanted.  The first half of this book is slow going.  Political maneuvering and the emotional fallout that Cass faces in dealing with the death of her friend and lover take up a good part of the book.  It wasn’t until I had almost given up that the story began to pick up steam.  The second half definitely delivered the action that I was looking for, and I have to say I didn’t see where this plot was headed until it was hitting me square in the shocked (happy) face.  I think this would have been a more engaging book if the author had taken less time to develop the characters and the political climate, but I think that the series would have ultimately suffered for it.  If you liked The Fire Sermon, I think you owe it to yourself to pick up the sequel.  I encourage you to persevere through the first half, because it is definitely worth it.  Myself, I’m beginning the impatient watch for book three.  Language and situations are appropriate for high school readers, but adult readers of YA will enjoy the series just as much.

I received an ARC from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

The 13th Continuum

Standard
The 13th Continuum

The 13th Continuum is another YA dystopian, meaning it didn’t add much to the genre.  Weak characters and a lack of logic made for a rather dull read.  Die hard dystopian devotees will still probably find it hard to pass up, but if you are over it, you won’t miss much here.  As usual, there are other reviewers who thought it topped sliced bread, but I gave it three stars.

image

Goodreads Summary

One thousand years after a cataclysmic event leaves humanity on the brink of extinction, the survivors take refuge in continuums designed to sustain the human race until repopulation of Earth becomes possible. Against this backdrop, a group of young friends in the underwater Thirteenth Continuum dream about life outside their totalitarian existence, an idea that has been outlawed for centuries. When a shocking discovery turns the dream into a reality, they must decide if they will risk their own extinction to experience something no one has for generations, the Surface.

My Thoughts

While I liked the idea of this book, I didn’t actually like the book. First, it didn’t feel polished. In particular, the pacing seemed off. I’m not sure if it was the amount of detail that was included in the social structure of the world or if it was really the result of trying to establish relationships between characters, but the fallout was that it slowed the story to the point that I began to lose interest. I thought it was smart for the author to incorporate the second colony because the appearance of Aero recaptured my interest for a while.

Second, the plot was problematic for me. I was never really clear about what motivated Aero’s colony, so I struggled to find the logic in the conflict.

Finally, I never really connected with any of the characters. Myra was an adequate character, but she didn’t really have any sparkle or wit about her. I liked her dedication to her family, but she was bland. Aero was a little more interesting because he was contemplating the negatives in his society but he was also able to show the advantages he felt he gained from the system. I found that much more intriguing than a character placed in an obviously flawed society. The relationship between these two was way too accelerated and I didn’t understand the logic behind that. Overall, this just wasn’t a book I connected with, and I don’t think it is engaging enough to keep my high school students interested, though the premise will certainly catch their attention. Language and situations are appropriate for middle and high school readers.

I received an ARC from the publisher via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.

 

The End of Fun by Sean McGinty was kind of fun, but it was also stressful

Standard
The End of Fun by Sean McGinty was kind of fun, but it was also stressful

To be honest, this book kind of wore me out.  I’m not sure if it was just the challenge of dealing with a narrator who has the judgement of a three year old or if it was the format, which required a lot of product placement.  Both of those elements are essential to the humor and the strong narrative voice in the story, though, and are actually what I think many YA readers will find appealing.

image

Goodreads Summary

Everyday reality is a drag™.

FUN®—the latest in augmented reality—is fun (yay!) but it’s also frustrating, glitchy and dangerously addictive (boo!). Just when everyone else is getting on, seventeen-year-old Aaron O’Faolain wants off.

But first, he has to complete his Application for Termination, and in order to do that he has to deal with his History—not to mention the present, including his grandfather’s suicide and a series of clues that may (or may not) lead to buried treasure. As he attempts to unravel the mystery, Aaron is sidetracked again…and again. Shadowed by his virtual “best friend” Homie, Aaron struggles with love, loss, dog bites, werewolf pills, community theater, wild horses, wildfires and the fact (deep breath) that actual reality can sometimes surprise you.

Sean McGinty’s strikingly profound and laugh-out-loud funny debut unearths a world that is eerily familiar, yet utterly original. Discover what it means to come to the end of fun.

My Thoughts

Aaron is an impulsive idiot, but he is trying to move in the right direction, and his attempts at taking charge of his own fate are often disastrous and hilarious.  I liked him, but I felt like he needed a babysitter.  As far as the cast of supporting characters went, they were just as likeable, if often as misguided as Aaron.  If you are looking for a book to make you laugh, this is probably a good choice.  But I, of course, want something more than just laughs, so I was disappointed that the satire of the story was so subtle.  My initial impression was that this book was going to push at issues of technology and the environment, but, by the end, I was confused  about what the message really was.  Okay, I’m pretty sure the message was that humans suck and only really care about their own happiness and entertainment, even when they know it comes at a great cost.  That might be more disturbing than the thought that the author just lost the thread.  Either way, I wasn’t quite satisfied that Aaron didn’t take some action, and I’m not talking about some huge action, which would have been out of character.  A verbal warning about the apparent negatives of Fun! to his nearest and dearest would have satisfied me.  While I’m not sure my high school students will be able to articulate the issue, I do think the book will provoke some discussion, and that is always a good thing.  Overall, this wasn’t my cup of tea, but I can see many of my readers, guys especially, enjoying it.  Language and situations are most appropriate for grades 9+.

I received an ARC from the publishers via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

Flawed by Cecelia Ahern – Can You Dictate Morality?

Standard
Flawed by Cecelia Ahern – Can You Dictate Morality?

While the YA dystopian seems to have just about run itself dry, I just can’t seem to let the genre go.  Flawed looked so enticing that I couldn’t resist, and hard core dystopian fans probably won’t be able to either.  However, this book did eventually end up on my “meh” list.

image

Goodreads Summary

Celestine North lives a perfect life. She’s a model daughter and sister, she’s well-liked by her classmates and teachers, and she’s dating the impossibly charming Art Crevan.

But then Celestine encounters a situation where she makes an instinctive decision. She breaks a rule. And now faces life-changing repercussions.

She could be imprisoned. She could be branded. She could be found FLAWED.

In her breathtaking young adult debut, bestselling author Cecelia Ahern depicts a society where obedience is paramount and rebellion is punished. And where one young woman decides to take a stand that could cost her-everything.

My Thoughts

I wasn’t immediately engaged by Flawed, but once I reached a certain point, I didn’t want to put it down.  However I’ve reached the conclusion that my engagement didn’t really equal a satisfactory read because what I had been reading for never really materialized.  In the end, I’d have to say this book was okay, but it isn’t going to the top of my recommendations list.  I did liked the fact that the premise is centered around a society that mandates morality, because that is increasingly a risk based on the politics of today – I was expecting a gentler version of Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale, and to some degree, that is what I got.  I think that devotees to Dystopian YA will probably be interested in the book.  I also think that in a world full of YA distopian reads, this book lacks the real spark to make it worth most readers’ time.  The majority of the book is exposition and the real climax occurs way too late in the game.  It only took a few chapters to identify how the morality system in Celestine’s world is corrupt, but the bulk of the book is spent reiterating that point.  I kept waiting for the pivotal moment that would send Celestine into action, and I never really got that.  To be fair, this is suppose to be the journey of a girl who starts out buying wholeheartedly what the government is selling, or at least believing it isn’t her job to question the system.  The problem is that her journey is mostly her nattering around and worrying about an AWOL boyfriend that should have exited stage left long before the climax.  The “hot” guy that I kept waiting to get the ball rolling is equally AWOL.  I don’t think every YA needs a romance, but this book set one up and the just left it sitting until it grew cold.  I feel like the author is setting up a big rebellion and a love triangle in the next book, but that doesn’t help this book be any more exciting.  And there will be a next book because there is somewhat of an abrupt stop at the end, and next to no resolution in the final pages.  That is irritating to many readers, so it is worth mentioning.  Overall, I think the book is eclipsed by so many other works in this genre, and it is hard to not expect certain things from a disenchanted heroine.  Most readers will be disappointed.  Language and situations are appropriate for grades 8+.

I received an ARC from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

Gena Showalter’s YA offering, Firstlife, is the pop ballad version of the age old battle between good and evil

Standard
Gena Showalter’s YA offering, Firstlife, is the pop ballad version of the age old battle between good and evil

So, I own a Miley Cyrus song.  An embarrassing one that is probably from a Hannah Montana album.  When my son saw it in my downloads the other day and began laughing his preteen butt off, I was ashamed.  But I rallied.  You see, See You Again makes me remember what it was like to be so young and uncertain in love, and, By Golly, it’s catchy.  It might be a far cry from high brow, but I enjoy it, so that should count for something.  I kind of feel the same way about this book.  It wasn’t a great literary work, and it might even have been a bad literary work in the scale of things, but I was engaged.  I’m a little embarrassed at how much I was entertained by it, but I did while away a few happy hours in this strange work, and that counts for something.  I gave it three stars.

image

Goodreads Summary
ONE CHOICE.

TWO REALMS.

NO SECOND CHANCE.

Tenley “Ten” Lockwood is an average seventeen-year-old girl…who has spent the past thirteen months locked inside the Prynne Asylum. The reason? Not her obsession with numbers, but her refusal to let her parents choose where she’ll live—after she dies.

There is an eternal truth most of the world has come to accept: Firstlife is merely a dress rehearsal, and real life begins after death.

In the Everlife, two realms are in power: Troika and Myriad, longtime enemies and deadly rivals. Both will do anything to recruit Ten, including sending their top Laborers to lure her to their side. Soon, Ten finds herself on the run, caught in a wild tug-of-war between the two realms who will do anything to win the right to her soul. Who can she trust? And what if the realm she’s drawn to isn’t home to the boy she’s falling for? She just has to stay alive long enough to make a decision…

My Thoughts

While Firstlife has sweeping themes about the battle between dark and light and the conflict between individual versus society, serious readers will find it difficult to navigate the fluff.  The first twenty percent of the book is full of unnatural conversational patter that relies heavily on references to testicles.  It is fast, and perhaps funny to the right audience, but it makes it hard to take the concept seriously from the start.  Add in the fact that the main character, Ten, seems more torn about her conflicted attraction to a super hot guy than the actual outcome of the battle for her soul, and this book becomes little more than a pop song rendition of one of literature’s most enduring themes.   Now, I’m a bit of a snob, and it hurts me a little to admit that, despite its shortcomings, I thought Firstlife was pretty engaging.  I didn’t understand the concept completely, but there was just enough there to keep me reading for answers.  There was a lot of suspense because, though I had my clear ideas about which side should win this fight, Ten was stubbornly uncertain until the end.  And while I didn’t care for all of the characters, I have to say that many of them were surprisingly dynamic.  I think the real star of the show was Ten’s nemesis turned ally, Sloan.  Overall, this was an entertaining, if not exactly memorable, read.  Language and innuendo make this most appropriate for high school readers.

I received an ARC from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

Darkthaw, the sequel to Kate A. Boorman’s Winterkill, was a bit of a bust for me

Standard
Darkthaw, the sequel to Kate A. Boorman’s Winterkill, was a bit of a bust for me

Darkthaw is the sequel to Winterkill, a strange little dystopian that has all the creepy atmosphere and suspense of The Village but with some religion thrown in that rivals the Puritans in The Crucible.  If you haven’t read Winterkill, Darkthaw will make very little sense.  I’m going to be honest when I say I did read Winterkill, and Darthaw still made very little sense to me.  I still gave this book three stars, and really dedicated fans will probably disagree, but this wasn’t my favorite follow up read.

image

Goodreads Summary

For as long as Emmeline can remember, she’s longed to leave the isolated world of the settlement and explore the wilderness that calls to her in her dreams. And now that the Council has fallen, she will finally, finally get that chance. With First Peoples guide Matisa at her side, Emmeline rallies a brave group to join her on her quest into the unknown, including her beloved Kane and his two younger brothers.

But the journey soon proves far more dangerous than Emmeline anticipated—with warring clans, slavers, colonists, disease, and natural disasters seemingly at every turn. After putting so many lives in danger, she starts to doubt everything she once knew. Did she make the right choice to leave the settlement—and can her relationship with Kane survive the ordeal? Matisa insists that to set things right and to fight the evil that is bringing all this danger and turmoil to the forest, Emmeline must journey to Matisa’s people—even if that means leaving Kane behind.

My Thoughts

In all honesty, I feel like the author lost her way in this book.  What I enjoyed most about the first book was the mystery of what lies beyond the walls, and it is hard to finally reveal the world beyond that wall and let it live up to what readers built up in their own imaginations. I also found that this book felt a little aimless.  What was meant to be an important journey was lost to subplots that didn’t clearly move the story forward, and I struggled to make clear connections with the events and character growth as well.  The story became convoluted when too many characters and groups showed up, giving readers little sense of who or what the protagonist was fighting against or for.  I think the story would have been much stronger if a clear antagonist had stepped forward instead of four maybe friend/maybe foe groups.  There was a bit of the deus ex machina in the climax of the story as well.   I don’t think that has to be considered a bad thing, but it added to the feeling that the author wasn’t fully sure where this story was headed.  While the resolution did wrap up the journey, I was a little baffled by the last pages, and if can’t see where the series is headed.  What I can say is that there was a lot of action, so if that was really what the author was aiming to add to the series, it was a successful ploy.  However, I felt like other, more importat elements were sacrificed, and in the end, it felt more like a trail of uncertain horror than a real journey towards a resolution to the series.  Language and situations are appropriate for high school readers.

I received an ARC from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

Nightfall is YA fiction with an intriguing premise that is hard to resist

Standard
Nightfall is YA fiction with an intriguing premise that is hard to resist

Nightfall is a light horror/mystery and full of action that is probably going to be most engaging for the middle school reader. The characters come across as too naive, and it did lack some depth, but it managed to surprise me with its twists and turns.  It wasn’t exactly what I wanted or expected, but you might be hard pressed not to give it a try once you read the premise – all I could think was The Village, and I couldn’t resist!  Three star read.

image

Goodreads Summary

The dark will bring your worst nightmares to light, in this gripping and eerie survival story, perfect for fans of James Dashner and Neil Gaiman.

On Marin’s island, sunrise doesn’t come every twenty-four hours—it comes every twenty-eight years. Now the sun is just a sliver of light on the horizon. The weather is turning cold and the shadows are growing long.

Because sunset triggers the tide to roll out hundreds of miles, the islanders are frantically preparing to sail south, where they will wait out the long Night.

Marin and her twin brother, Kana, help their anxious parents ready the house for departure. Locks must be taken off doors. Furniture must be arranged. Tables must be set. The rituals are puzzling—bizarre, even—but none of the adults in town will discuss why it has to be done this way.

Just as the ships are about to sail, a teenage boy goes missing—the twins’ friend Line. Marin and Kana are the only ones who know the truth about where Line’s gone, and the only way to rescue him is by doing it themselves. But Night is falling. Their island is changing.

And it may already be too late.

My Thoughts

Nightfall is a book that will draw a wide range of readers with its intruiging premise, but, as I said, it will probably be most satisfying to a middle school crowd.  The narrative is shared by three teens who have been left behind in the bustle of an exodus of their village from an island.  This island goes dark every fourteen years, and as the night gets closer, the villagers engage in some strange rituals that have been part of their migration for hundreds of years.  While readers will quickly guess what nightfall on the island brings, the young protagonists don’t.  The fact that they don’t put the pieces together until the answer is staring them right in the face is one of the many reasons that they come across as younger than expected.  Their character arcs, too, are fairly simple.  Growth seems small in comparison to their experiences through the course of the novel, and that left me a little disappointed in the end, especially since the biggest epiphany is one that I guessed at nearly the beginning of the story.  I think middle school readers will be less bothered by this because they will probably be focused on the action and the atmosphere more than character growth.  There is a lot of action once the story gets rolling, and there is certainly enough threat to the characters to keep readers engaged.  I honestly couldn’t predict what was going to happen next, and I wasn’t certain how this would end until it drew to a close.  I enjoyed it for what it was, a fast and light adventure with a side of menace, but I was left a little disappointed by the character development.

I received an ARC from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

The Scorpion Rules by Erin Bow – YA SciFi as intriguing as anything I’ve read this year

Standard
The Scorpion Rules by Erin Bow – YA SciFi as intriguing as anything I’ve read this year

Erin Bow’s The Scorpion Rules has a big buzz going in the YA book world, and I have to say it lives up to the buzz.  It has all the things I want in a book (thus, all the things you want in a book) and it is wildly different from anything else I’ve read this year. Ultimately, I had a few problems with it so it was only a four star read, but if you want to keep your status as the hip kid at the bookstore cafe (or the biggest Geek in the SciFi Club), you are going to want in on this book early.

The Scorpion Rules is publishing September 22, 2015.

image

Goodreads Summary

A world battered by climate shift and war turns to an ancient method of keeping peace: the exchange of hostages. The Children of Peace – sons and daughters of kings and presidents and generals – are raised together in small, isolated schools called Preceptures. There, they learn history and political theory, and are taught to gracefully accept what may well be their fate: to die if their countries declare war.

Greta Gustafsen Stuart, Duchess of Halifax and Crown Princess of the Pan-Polar Confederation, is the pride of the North American Precepture. Learned and disciplined, Greta is proud of her role in keeping the global peace, even though, with her country controlling two-thirds of the world’s most war-worthy resource — water — she has little chance of reaching adulthood alive.

Enter Elián Palnik, the Precepture’s newest hostage and biggest problem. Greta’s world begins to tilt the moment she sees Elián dragged into the school in chains. The Precepture’s insidious surveillance, its small punishments and rewards, can make no dent in Elián, who is not interested in dignity and tradition, and doesn’t even accept the right of the UN to keep hostages.

What will happen to Elián and Greta as their two nations inch closer to war?

My Thoughts

There are many reasons I quickly lost contact with the outside world when I started reading this book.  First, the premise – Artificial Intelligence decides the only way to end the wars that threaten humanity is to keep rulers in check by holding their royal offspring as hostages. One of those hostages is going to throw a wrench in that plan in a pretty horrible way.  Awesome.  Second, Greta – the narrator and protagonist is compelling and smart and pretty scared she will die very, very soon.  Yes, please!  Third, the setting – a mind melt of pastoral harmony and menacing threat – think 1984 set in an Abbey with intelligent robot spiders who like their tazers.  Brilliant!  Finally, the AI running this rodeo – awful in such a crazy good way that readers are probably going to be talking about him more than anything else in this entire book.  So we have all the hallmarks of a huge hit – kids threatened with death for the greater good, strong yet sensitive female protagonist, rebellion, evil robots.  So why doesn’t my review have a huge five star rating at the top?  Because I’m still struggling with the way this one ended.  I don’t exactly hate it, but I’m not sure what to do with it, and I think a lot of readers will struggle with that as well.  Don’t get me wrong.  I think you should scoop this book up and run to your reading hidey hole immediately, but I bet you are going to want to talk this one out as soon as you finish.  I think this is going to be a very big deal in the YA reading world, and if you want in on the conversation, you are going to want to read it.  Now.  Before someone corrupts it with a movie deal.  I have no doubt this will be a hot item with my high school readers, and I think lots of adults are going to find it just as compelling. Language and situations are appropriate for high school readers who are prepared for some sensuality and bloodshed (that means all of them).

I received an ARC from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.